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Gyeongbokgung Palace: the largest of the five palaces constructed by the Joseon Dynasty. Joseon lasted for 500 years and laid the foundation for major aspects of Korean culture and identity, including the entrenchment of Confucian ideals and doctrines in Korean society, and the importation and adaptation of Chinese culture. 

Bukchon Hanok Village: Surrounded by Gyeongbokgung Palace, Changdeokgung Palace and Jongmyo Shrine, Bukchon Hanok Village is home to hundreds of traditional houses called ‘hanok’ that date back to the Joseon Dynasty. The name, ‘Bukchon,’ which literally translates to ‘northern village,’ came about as the neighborhoods that the village covers lie to the north of the two significant Seoul landmarks, Cheonggyecheon Stream and Jongno. 

Jogyesa Temple is the center of Zen Buddhism in Korea, and is famous for being located in the city. From the busy streets of Jongno, follow the road towards Anguk Subway Station, and you will see Jogyesa Temple. 

Insadong Antique Alley is famous for streets filled with the flavors of tradition and is universally well-loved by tourists. Here, foreigners can purchase traditional souvenirs at low prices and taste authentic dishes by stepping into a Korean restaurant found on every street corner. 

N Seoul Tower (236 meters) is a prominent city landmark. After opening in 1975, the facility operated solely as a radio transmission tower until opening to the public in 1981. The tower has since been a favorite attraction for both local and international visitors. It is a must visit location for international travelers who are interested in panoramic views of Seoul. 

Suwon Hwaseong Fortress is an impressive structure from the latter part of the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1910) and the official fortress of Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do. The fortress (constructed from 1794 to 1796) was built as a show of the King’s filial piety towards his father Jangheonseja and to build a new pioneer city with its own economic power. The fortress was designated as Historical Monument No. 3 in January 1963, and in December 1997, it was designated a UNESCO World Cultural Heritage Site. 

Korean Folk Village: Set in a natural environment occupying approximately 243 acres, visitors can experience the natural atmosphere with over 260 traditional houses reminiscent of the late Joseon Dynasty, including various household goods from different regions. All these features have been relocated and restored to provide visitors with a broad understanding of Korean food, clothing, and housing style of the past.

 

Gyeongju National Museum rests deep in tradition, with a history of about 90 years. Representing Gyeongju, which used to be the capital of Silla (BC57~AD935), the museum is where you can view the cultural history of Gyeongju district

Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb) – Large ancient tombs of kings and noblemen of the Silla Dynasty can be seen around Gyeongju at the Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb). There are twenty-three large tombs located here; the most famous being Cheonmachong and Hwangnamdaechong. In an excavation of the area in the 1970’s, Cheonmachong was discovered with a painting of mounted horse. This painting is the only discovered painting from the Silla Era. You can also view the inside of Cheonmachong. There are 11,526 remains and crowns of the king inside the tomb demonstrating the lavish lifestyle of the king. 

Cheomseongdae Observatory is the oldest existing astronomical observatory in Asia. Constructed during the reign of Queen Seon-deok (632-647), it was used for observing the stars in order to forecast the weather. This stone structure is a beautiful combination of straight lines and curves, and was designated as National Treasure No.31 on December 20th, 1962. 

Anapji Pond, the largest man-made pond dating back to the Silla era, was built with a curved shape, so it’s difficult to view the entire pond from any single location. This makes the pond seem infinitely long and wide, but what’s more interesting is that its shape appears to change depending on where one is standing. 

Bulguksa Temple is the representative relic of Gyeongju and was designated as a World Cultural Asset by UNESCO in 1995. The beauty of the temple itself and the artistic touch of the stone relics are known throughout the world. 

Seokguram Grotto, located on Mt. Tohamsan, is the representative stone temple of Korea. Seokguram is an artificial stone temple made of granite, and is located on the eastern peak of Mt. Toham. Inside the round-shaped main hall, there are the Bonjon Statue, Bodhi-sattva and his disciples.

 

Woljeongri Beach is known for its scenery, tranquil white sand and beautiful emerald ocean. Near the beach, a stretch of cozy and beautiful cafes aligned the streets. In additiona, a drive along the beach will be great to appreciate the exotic landscapes of Jeju-do island. 

Seongsan Sunrise Peak rose from under the sea in a volcanic eruption about 100,000 years ago. Located on the eastern end of Jeju Island, there is a huge crater at the top of Seongsan Sunrise Peak. The crater is about 600m in diameter and 90m high. With the 99 sharp rocks surrounding the crater, it looks like a gigantic crown. While the southeast and north sides are cliffs, the northwest side is a hill with grass that is connected to the Seongsan Village. 

Jusangjeolli Cliff is stone pillars piled up along the coast and is a designated cultural monument of Jejudo Island. The Jusangjeolli was formed when the lava from Mt.Hallasan erupted into the sea of Jungmun. They are rock pillars shaped like cubes or hexagons of various sizes and almost seem as if stonemasons had carved them out. 

Yongmeori Beach is a place where Mt. Sanbangsan stretches into the ocean and it looks as if a dragon’s head is going underwater. This area is made of Sa-am stacks, built up over millions of years. 

O’sulloc Museum: At the O’sulloc Museum, not only can visitors enjoy unique o’sulloc teas, but they can relax next to the lotus pond in the indoor garden. The second floor of the building has an observatory, so visitors can enjoy the views of the nearby green tea fields and the surrounding landscape. 

Mysterious Road, also known as Dokkaebi Road, lies on a hill at the foot of a mountain, and connects two major highways on Jejudo Island. It has earned its name, as objects and liquid appear to roll and flow up the hill instead of down, when, in fact, such image of gravity defiance is an optical illusion rendered by the seemingly high surroundings.

 


 

Tomb of King Muryeong-wang (reign 462-523) contains representative relics of the Baekje period (234-678). The Songsan-ri Tombs contain the graves of kings from the period when Baekje’s capital was Gongju, and it is believed to contain 10 such graves. Only seven graves have been discovered so far. 
The main attraction of Tomb of King Muryeong-wang is the wall painting drawn on the number six tomb-it is the only art of its kind in the world, created from the way the bricks were laid to create the wall. The tomb is shaped like a long tunnel, the top rounded like a dome. There are pictures of fire-breathing dragons on the tomb. Only the parts of the wall where the pictures were to be drawn had earth coated on, and on that earth was drawn Sasindo, the Four Symbols-blue dragon, white tiger, red peacock, and black turtle. 

Gongsanseong Fortress consists of a mud castle of 400m long and a stone castle of 2,260m. The circumference and dimension of this fortress are 2,660m long and 210,000㎡ wide. It is located on basin-type hill of 110m MSL with the road linked to the downtown to the south and Geumgang river to the north. It was originally a mud castle, but most parts of it was renovated to a stone castle as it is from the reign of King Seonjo and King Injo in Joseon Dynasty. Gongsanseong Fortress was a capital in Baekje period, but it played certain roles by period in the changes of history as well as in Baekje period. Therefore, relics in each period remained in many places.

Busosanseong Fortress (Historic Site No. 5) is a mud fortress located on top of Busosan Mountain (alt. 106m) in the northern part of Buyeo. The fortress is estimated by some to have been built around 538 AD (16th year of King Seongwang) to protect Sabi (now Buyeo), which was once the capital of the Baekje Kingdom. 
Busosan Mountain was once considered the guardian mountain of Buyeo and is home to historic landmarks from the Baekje Kingdom (18 BC-660 AD). In addition to Busosanseong Fortress, some of the most famous sites on the mountain include Baekhwajeong Pavilion, Sajaru Pavilion, Banwollu Pavilion, Yeongillu Pavilion, Samchungsa Shrine (dedicated to three loyal subjects of the Baekje Kingdom), Gungnyeosa Shrine, Goransa Temple, Gunchangji (military warehouse site), and Suhyeoljugeoji (site of pit houses for the Baekje soldiers). The mountain is also home to Nakhwaam Rock where, according to legend, 3,000 women of the Baekje Kingdom threw themselves into the river below after the collapse of the empire.

Jeongnimsaji Five-story Stone Pagoda at Jeongnimsa Temple: This granite pagoda from the late Baekje period in Buyeo-eup, Buyeo-gun, Chungcheongnam-do has been designated National Treasure No. 9. It is generally known as the ‘Baekje 5-story Pagoda.’ In the past, it would have been called ‘Pyeongjetap.’ As one of two extant Baekje pagodas, this stone pagoda itself is a precious artifact and very important in establishing the lineage of Korean stone pagoda patterns. With refined and creative features, it exemplifies the beauty and elegance that were imitated in pagodas built in later periods.

Geumsan Ginseng Market: Geumsan is widely known as the longest ginseng market in Korea, holding 80% of the nation’s ginseng trade. Along with its enormous ginseng industry, Geumsan is also rising as the largest herbal medicine market in the country. The Geumsan Gingseng Market is a traditional market with a long-standing history, offering a variety of health products at its international market.

Gyejoksan Mountaion Red Clay Trail is an eco-healing walking trail which can be found on the nation’s first mountain with a barefoot walking theme, Mt. Gyejok. In 2008, it was considered as one of the ‘33 travel destinations to go back to’ by travel journalists. Visitors can walk on red clay and breathe in the fresh aroma of pine trees while enjoying a view of downtown Daejeon from Gyejoksanseong Fortress, which was built during the time of the Three Kingdoms. The trail helps restore the health of the body and soul and gives visitors a therapeutic and unique experience. 

Daecheong Dam is a multi-purpose dam consisting of a 72m-tall and 495m-long concrete gravity dam and rock fill dam. It is located where Daejeon and Chungcheongbuk-do meet. The observatory, located at Palgakjeong Service Area, offers a great view of Daecheongho Lake. A variety of fascinating items are displayed in the Water Culture Center on the left bank of Daecheong Dam.

 


 


Gyeonggijeon shrine was erected in 1410 and holds the portrait of King Tae-jo, the founder of the Joseon Dynasty. The King and his wife’s mortuary tablets are enshrined here at Jogyeong Shrine. Inside Gyeonggijeon, the portraits of King Tae-jo and other successive kings such as Sun-jong, Cheol-jong, Yeong-jo and many others can be found on display. 

Jeonju Hanok Village has over 800 traditional Korean ‘hanok’ houses. This village is especially beautiful for its roof curves. The roof edges being slightly raised to the sky is unique. The food provided is very traditional, which adds to the traditional ambience. At Jeonju Hanok Village, visitors can enjoy traditional Korean life and traditional foods like bibimbap, the most well-known dish from the Jeonju region.

Gongju Hanok Village: Gongju is called the ‘museum having no roof’ as it is full of various historical sites from the Baekje period. Located between the Royal Tomb of King Muryeong and Gongju National Museum, Gongju Hanok Village is comprised of new-style Korean houses combining new elements with the unique ambience of traditional Korean houses with underfloor heating, a pavilion and various hands-on program to learn about the history of Baekje.

Bulguksa Temple is the representative relic of Gyeongju and was designated as a World Cultural Asset by UNESCO in 1995. The beauty of the temple itself and the artistic touch of the stone relics are known throughout the world. 

Gyeongju National Museum rests deep in tradition, with a history of about 90 years. Representing Gyeongju, which used to be the capital of Silla (BC57~AD935), the museum is where you can view the cultural history of Gyeongju district. 

Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb) – Large ancient tombs of kings and noblemen of the Silla Dynasty can be seen around Gyeongju at the Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb). There are twenty-three large tombs located here; the most famous being Cheonmachong and Hwangnamdaechong. In an excavation of the area in the 1970’s, Cheonmachong was discovered with a painting of mounted horse. This painting is the only discovered painting from the Silla Era. You can also view the inside of Cheonmachong. There are 11,526 remains and crowns of the king inside the tomb demonstrating the lavish lifestyle of the king. 

Cheomseongdae is the oldest existing astronomical observatory in Asia. Constructed during the reign of Queen Seon-deok (632-647), it was used for observing the stars in order to forecast the weather. This stone structure is a beautiful combination of straight lines and curves, and was designated as National Treasure No.31 on December 20th, 1962.

 


 

Korean Folk Village: Set in a natural environment occupying approximately 243 acres, visitors can experience the natural atmosphere with over 260 traditional houses reminiscent of the late Joseon Dynasty, including various household goods from different regions. All these features have been relocated and restored to provide visitors with a broad understanding of Korean food, clothing, and housing style of the past. 

Gyeongbokgung Palace: the largest of the five palaces constructed by the Joseon Dynasty. Joseon lasted for 500 years and laid the foundation for major aspects of Korean culture and identity, including the entrenchment of Confucian ideals and doctrines in Korean society, and the importation and adaptation of Chinese culture. 

Bukchon Hanok Village: Surrounded by Gyeongbokgung Palace, Changdeokgung Palace and Jongmyo Shrine, Bukchon Hanok Village is home to hundreds of traditional houses called ‘hanok’ that date back to the Joseon Dynasty. The name, ‘Bukchon,’ which literally translates to ‘northern village,’ came about as the neighborhoods that the village covers lie to the north of the two significant Seoul landmarks, Cheonggyecheon Stream and Jongno. 

Insadong Antique Alley is famous for streets filled with the flavors of tradition and is universally well-loved by tourists. Here, foreigners can purchase traditional souvenirs at low prices and taste authentic dishes by stepping into a Korean restaurant found on every street corner. <DMZ>

The 3rd Tunnel: The 3rd Tunnel was discovered in 1978 by Korean forces. It spans over 1635m in length, 2m in width, and 2m in height and is located 52km from Seoul. It is estimated that approximately 30,000 soldiers could move through the tunnel per hour. Once the tunnel was found, North Koreans insisted it was intentionally made by us to invade North Korea, but, their insistence was proven untrue as the explosions used to make the tunnel face southward. 

Dora Observatory: Situated in Paju and at the northernmost point of the Military Demarcation Line of the Western Front, the Dora Observatory replaced the previous Songaksan Observation Post which was closed. From the observatory, visitors can overlook North Korea and its various locations including Gaeseong, Songaksan, Kim Il-Sung Statue, and Cooperation Farm.

Namdaemun Market: Opened in 1964, the Namdaemun Market is the largest traditional market in Korea with various goods in store. All products are sold at affordable prices and the stores in this area also function as a wholesale market. 

Myeongdong is one of the busiest places in Seoul and is among Korea’s premier shopping destinations. Over 1 million shoppers pass through this area each and every day. Located in the heart of Seoul, Myeong-dong market has been a witness to Korea’s tumultuous modern-day history as a center of city politics, economy, and culture. To international visitors, Myeong-dong is a stunning shopping district with countless shops and restaurants. Its wild popularity has led to similar shopping districts springing up all across the country.

 

Busan Tower in Yongdusan Park is a popular landmark of Busan. On the first floor of the tower is a souvenir shop that sells Korean traditional handicrafts like masks, key chains, wallets, pottery, dolls and more. At the top is an observatory where the entire city of Busan can be seen. 

BIFF Square: Busan’s modern movie district was originally little more than a pair of cinemas that were built following Korea’s liberation from Japanese colonial rule over half a century ago. However, major renovations took place ahead of the first Busan International Film Festival (BIFF) in 1996, and the newly transformed district was named BIFF Square on August 14, 1996. 

Gwangandaegyo Bridge: It is the largest bridge over the ocean in Korea. Equipped with artistic light, the bridge showcases splendid light that changes every day and every season. The bridge offers majesty beauty combined with nearby attractions during the day and a romantic atmosphere at night, attracting many residents and tourists. 

Nurimaru APEC House: The name Nurimaru APEC House is created by combining the Korean words nuri (“world”) and maru (“summit”), and “APEC House,” which refers to an APEC conference hall. Collectively, it means “a house where the world summits gather together for an APEC meeting.” 

Gyeongju National Museum rests deep in tradition, with a history of about 90 years. Representing Gyeongju, which used to be the capital of Silla (BC57~AD935), the museum is where you can view the cultural history of Gyeongju district 

Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb) – Large ancient tombs of kings and noblemen of the Silla Dynasty can be seen around Gyeongju at the Daereungwon Tomb Complex (Cheonmachong Tomb). There are twenty-three large tombs located here; the most famous being Cheonmachong and Hwangnamdaechong. In an excavation of the area in the 1970’s, Cheonmachong was discovered with a painting of mounted horse. This painting is the only discovered painting from the Silla Era. You can also view the inside of Cheonmachong. There are 11,526 remains and crowns of the king inside the tomb demonstrating the lavish lifestyle of the king. 

Cheomseongdae Observatory is the oldest existing astronomical observatory in Asia. Constructed during the reign of Queen Seon-deok (632-647), it was used for observing the stars in order to forecast the weather. This stone structure is a beautiful combination of straight lines and curves, and was designated as National Treasure No.31 on December 20th, 1962.

Bulguksa Temple is the representative relic of Gyeongju and was designated as a World Cultural Asset by UNESCO in 1995. The beauty of the temple itself and the artistic touch of the stone relics are known throughout the world. 

Seokguram Grotto, located on Mt. Tohamsan, is the representative stone temple of Korea. Seokguram is an artificial stone temple made of granite, and is located on the eastern peak of Mt. Toham. Inside the round-shaped main hall, there are the Bonjon Statue, Bodhi-sattva and his disciples.

Woljeongri Beach is known for its scenery, tranquil white sand and beautiful emerald ocean. Near the beach, a stretch of cozy and beautiful cafes aligned the streets. In additiona, a drive along the beach will be great to appreciate the exotic landscapes of Jeju-do island. 

Seongsan Sunrise Peak rose from under the sea in a volcanic eruption about 100,000 years ago. Located on the eastern end of Jeju Island, there is a huge crater at the top of Seongsan Sunrise Peak. The crater is about 600m in diameter and 90m high. With the 99 sharp rocks surrounding the crater, it looks like a gigantic crown. While the southeast and north sides are cliffs, the northwest side is a hill with grass that is connected to the Seongsan Village. 

Jusangjeolli Cliff is stone pillars piled up along the coast and is a designated cultural monument of Jejudo Island. The Jusangjeolli was formed when the lava from Mt.Hallasan erupted into the sea of Jungmun. They are rock pillars shaped like cubes or hexagons of various sizes and almost seem as if stonemasons had carved them out. 

Yongmeori Beach is a place where Mt. Sanbangsan stretches into the ocean and it looks as if a dragon’s head is going underwater. This area is made of Sa-am stacks, built up over millions of years. 

O’sulloc Museum: At the O’sulloc Museum, not only can visitors enjoy unique o’sulloc teas, but they can relax next to the lotus pond in the indoor garden. The second floor of the building has an observatory, so visitors can enjoy the views of the nearby green tea fields and the surrounding landscape. 

Mysterious, also known as Dokkaebi Road, lies on a hill at the foot of a mountain, and connects two major highways on Jejudo Island. It has earned its name, as objects and liquid appear to roll and flow up the hill instead of down, when, in fact, such image of gravity defiance is an optical illusion rendered by the seemingly high surroundings.